30/11/2020 – CFP: EAAS 2020

About

EAAS 2020 Conference coincides with the 400th anniversary of the establishment of the Plymouth Plantation. Falling on the quadricentennial, EAAS 2020 invites broader contemplations of American history, politics, and culture. The conference seeks to underscore questions of optics, distance, and acuity. The concept of “20/20 vision,” an optical term denoting “normal” visual clarity and sharpness of sight, invites a reflection on historical distance, focal points, visibility and invisibility of socio-historical, cultural, and literary aspects of American citizenship, space, and renewal until today.

19/07/2019 – CFP: Fourth Issue of The New Americanist/Special Feature Section: “American Studies in the Archive”

Special Feature Section: “American Studies in the Archive”

The New Americanist seeks articles for its fourth issue’s special feature section “American Studies in the Archive.” Articles whose framework largely depends on archival materials, or which theorize the role of the archive – either historically or in current practice – will be considered. Special consideration will be given to articles which take race, transnational, LGBTQ, or disability studies approaches. Leggi tutto “19/07/2019 – CFP: Fourth Issue of The New Americanist/Special Feature Section: “American Studies in the Archive””

01/07/2019 – CFP: Silence in/of the Archives: Absence, Erasure, Censorship, and Archival Politics

Panel Proposed by: Mahshid Mayar, Bielefeld University, Germany
Event: 6th European Congress on World and Global History (ENIUGH)
Theme: “Minorities, Cultures of Integration and Patterns of Exclusion”
Date and Venue: June 25-28, 2020, Turku, Finland Leggi tutto “01/07/2019 – CFP: Silence in/of the Archives: Absence, Erasure, Censorship, and Archival Politics”

01/09/2019 – CFP: O’Neill Beyond the Horizon(s) The 11th International Conference on Eugene O’Neill

Suffolk University
Boston, Massachusetts
June 17 – 20, 2020
At the 100-year anniversary of Eugene O’Neill’s first full-length play—Beyond the Horizon (1920), which garnered his first Pulitzer Prize–and of the first play to break the color line on Broadway—The Emperor Jones (1920)—it seems fitting to look beyond the many horizons that have shaped O’Neill’s legacy for modern theatre.